contact lens

Wearing contacts is a much safer alternative than glasses and not that expensive either. But there are some common issues that all contact lenses wearers face.

Here are 5 of those top issues and how to tackle them:

  1. Your contact lenses get torn

If your contact lenses are soft, it is especially likely that you might tear them. This most often happens because of your fingernails. It is also possible that you did not store them correctly in an adequate amount of solution that can cause them to dry out and become brittle. If you know the contact lens has torn, do not wear them. This can cause a corneal abrasion. If the lens tears while you are wearing them, apply rewetting drops before you attempt to remove them. Ensure that you get all the torn pieces out of your eye

2. Your contact lenses get stuck

This can happen if you go off to sleep with your lenses in your eyes or your eyes are too dry. Your lenses can get stuck in the center of your eyes are at the back of your eye. Blink several times to try and bring your lenses back at the center and apply rewetting drops to lubricate the lenses. If that does not help, use soft forceps to remove the lenses from your eyes. If nothing works, see a doctor. A stuck contact lens can give you a lot of grief so be sure to get it out before you suffer from itchiness, blurred vision or redness.

3. Your contact lenses are inside out

If you put in a contact lens inside out, it is not the end of the world. You will immediately know something is wrong. All you have to do is keep you cool, remove the lens and clean them. You can reapply this again. If you are using daily disposables, you can simply apply a fresh pair.

4. Your eyes are dry

A common problem for everyone that wears lenses, dry eyes commonly occur even if you are wearing modern lenses like the Air Optix colored contacts or Amara lenses. Discomfort can occur even in the most modern and breathable lenses. All you have to do is apply a rewetting solution. If the issue persists, you may have an underlying condition or an eye infection. If this is the case, you should see a doctor.

5. You have an eye infection

Wearing contact lenses does increase the risk of eye infections. This is because, at the end of the day, your lenses are a foreign body in your eye. If you are not careful, bacteria can accumulate in your eyes. It is easy to tell if you have an eye infection. Watch out for redness, pain, crusty debris, blurred vision, watery eyes. If you think you have an infection, see your doctor. To keep eye infections at bay, wash your hands regularly and wipe them on a lint-free towel. Also, make sure to use hypoallergenic makeup. You can also forego lenses during season allergies and follow after-care religiously.